Not by Fire but by Ice

THE NEXT ICE AGE - NOW!

Discover What Killed the Dinosaurs . . . and Why it Could Soon Kill Us

 
 
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The Alps growing and shrinking at same rate

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6 Nov 09 - Glaciers and rivers erode about exactly the same amount of material from the slopes of the Alps as is regenerated from the deep Earth's crust, says this new study by German and Swiss geoscientists.

Swiss geodesists have observed that the Alp summits, as compared to low land, rise up to one millimetre per year. Meanwhile, German researchers calculate that the climatic cycles of the glacial period in Europe over the past 2.5 million years have accelerated the erosion process.

"This mountain erosion cannot even be determined using the highly precise methods of modern geodesy," explains Professor Friedhelm v. Blanckenburg from the GFZ. "We use the rare isotope Beryllium-10, which develops in the land surface via cosmic radiation.

"Here pure upthrusting forces are at work. It is similar to an iceberg in the sea. If the top melts, the iceberg surfaces out of the water by almost the same share," explains von Blanckenburg.

       I think, rather, that the land is driven upward by electromagnetic forces
       (as I say in Not by Fire but by Ice).

       I also find it interesting that this article mentions beryllium-10, because
       peaks in beryllium-10 are found at magnetic reversals.
       (See Magnetic Reversals and Evolutionary Leaps, p. 53)

See entire article, entitled “Are The Alps Growing Or Shrinking?”
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105121207.htm
Thanks to Eunice Farmilant for this link

  

 

 

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