Nafanua

Not by Fire but by Ice

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  22 April 2006      

 

Underwater volcano grows 1,000 feet in five years

12 Apr 06 - Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography
have discovered a 1,000-foot (300 meter) volcanic cone on the Vailulu’u
Seamount off Samoa that didn’t exist just five years ago.

Dubbed Nafanua, the cone is growing so fast that it could breach the 
ocean’s surface within a few decades.

The cone is made of large pillow lava, a type of rock that forms when hot 
magma comes into contact with water and cools into large blobs, or "pillows."

One-foot-long eels swarm around warm hydrothermal vents near the 
cone’s summit.

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Hmmm. Imagine Mount St. Helens growing a fifth of a mile 
higher in five years. Then ask yourself, "Do you suppose underwater
volcanoes - not humans - could be heating the seas?"

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Click here to see full article:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,191478,00.html

(Thanks to Dave Gendron for this info.)

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Here's a previous article on the same subject:

Underwater volcano grows 1,000 feet in four years
May 25, 2005 - On an expedition to observe the Vailulu'u Volcano, an underwater volcano discovered in 1999 near American Samoa, scientists saw another volcano growing out of the first, like the island in the middle of Crater Lake .

Scientists dubbed the new volcano, about 20 miles (32 km) east of the island of Ta'u , Nafanua after the Samoan goddess of war. Growing at a rate of about 8 inches (20 cm) a day, Nafanua measured nearly 1,000 feet (300 meters) high. It could go much higher, said geologist Hubert Staudigel from the University of California at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The scientists were so amazed to find eels living in the newly formed lava that they
nicknamed the population "Eel City."

(Knowing that the temperature of the basalt should be around 2150 degrees Fahrenheit, I wonder why don’t we see any comments about how much heat underwater volcanoes must be pouring into the seas?)

See more at:
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/7984261/?GT1=6542

 

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See also It's not global warming, it's ocean warming

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