Not by Fire but by Ice

THE NEXT ICE AGE - NOW!

Discover What Killed the Dinosaurs . . . and Why it Could Soon Kill Us

 
 
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M
any areas in WA still retain last winter's snow
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22 Jun 09

Hi Robert,

I just finished a three-day backpacking trip through the Enchanted
Lakes Wilderness in Washington State. After we ascended Aasgard Pass (7,800') from Colchuck Lake we had to navigate through still mostly snow and ice-covered terrain. The trail was covered by snow for most of the route in the Enchanted Zone. Most of the lakes are still frozen or partially frozen. The snow and ice are not melting rapidly. It looked as though the last ice age never quite ended in this pristine wilderness. If the Earth were experiencing rapidly rising temperatures then by mid-June 2009 this region shouldn't have snow and ice, according to warming predictions I remember hearing a decade ago.

Actually, many areas in WA still retain last Winter's snow. Mt. Baker, WA is encapsulated in icy-blue glaciers; glaciers are not disappearing on that volcano or the other volcanoes in the state. Backcountry skiing will be excellent all summer and into Autumn. Supposed catastrophic global warming is non-existent in the Northwest despite everything that our radical Governor Christine Gregoire says. I'm stocking up on warm clothes for the decades of cooling to come.

If you'd like to see photos from my trip through the Enchanted Lakes go to: http://www.flickr.com/photos/retroproxy/sets/72157620158977679/
          Take a look at these photos. They're beautiful.

The best way to view the photos is in a slideshow.

Cheers, 
Josh Cooley

  

 

 

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Order Book I Q & A I Book Reviews I Plant Hardiness Zone Maps I Radio Interviews I Table of Contents I Excerpts I Author Photo I Pacemaker of the Ice Ages I Extent of Previous Glaciation I Crane Buried in Antarctic Ice Sheet I Ice Ages and Magnetic Reversals I It's Ocean Warming I E-Mail Robert at rwfelix@juno.com l Expanding Glaciers